September

List of 4 items.

  • SOLD OUT - How to play Mah Jongg

    THIS CLASS IS NOW SOLD OUT

    Instructor
    : Iris Pressman 
    Date: Tuesdays, September 11, 18, 25, October 2, 9, 16
    Time: 4:30 – 6:30 PM 
    Fee: $160 
     
    In this course you will learn how to play Mah Jongg, which originated in China. Similar to the card game Rummy, Mah Jongg is a game of skill, strategy and luck. The game uses small rectangular tiles stamped with symbols, numbers and characters. The object of the game is to be the first to assemble combinations of these tiles into specific patterns that make up a hand. You assemble combinations by picking and discarding tiles. 
     
    Instructor Iris Pressmanhas been playing this game for over 15 years and has taught many people how to play. She will provide the Mah Jongg League’s card and helpful handouts. This class is geared toward beginners.
  • Money & Numismatics in Maryland

    Instructor: Greg Ruby
    Date: Wednesday, September 26 
    Time: 7:00 9:00 PM
    Fee: $40
     
    Once the hobby of Kings, today finds coin collecting to be the king of hobbies. This program will discuss the coins that were issued shortly by Lord Baltimore after the establishment of the colony and the attempts by some enterprising local merchants after the Revolutionary War to create “small change” for a cash-starved marketplace. 
     
    In addition, the program will discuss paper currency, from the colonial notes that were “not worth a Continental,” to the scrip issued by private banks in the years leading up to the Civil War and then the National Bank Notes that were common in circulation. 
     
    Another topic covered are the merchant tokens, issued by businesses to promote their products, and the packing house tokens given to the workers in canning businesses along the waterfronts and farms throughout Maryland. Lastly, the truck farms in Anne Arundel County offer up the unique collecting of the brass pickers checks that were given to the laborers before being converted on pay days. 
     
    A freelance meeting and tradeshow consultant, Greg Ruby combines his passion for Baltimore and Maryland history with his interests in coin collecting and Sherlock Holmes. A past president of the Maryland Token and Medal Society and the Eastern States Numismatic Association, he is also the founder of the Sherlockians of Baltimore. He has been published in both the Sherlockian and numismatic press and is currently cataloging medals featuring Edgar Allan Poe.
  • Nantucket Baskets 101, 102, and Guild

    Instructor: Leslie Goldsmith 
    Date: Mondays, September 24, October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29
    Time: 6:00 – 8:30 PM 
    Fee: $125 / Materials Fee: $90 
     
    Nantucket baskets originated in the early 1800s on a light ship marking the shoals off the island. Small ships were used to replace light houses, and the sailors would weave reed and rattan to pass the time. Early baskets were crude compared to the craftsmanship used today. 
     
    Baskets 101 students will leave class with an 8” round Nantucket basket with a handle woven using rattan weaver and reed staves. Baskets 101 and 102 students will be mentored by the Guild, a group of experienced weavers who meet one night a week to weave baskets, exchange ideas and share weaving experience. 102/Guild will select baskets to work on, such as round, oval, nests, trays and purses. You are encouraged to bring projects and weaving issues to the Guild for assistance. Discussion will be conducted concerning making molds, rims, bases, handles and special tools to make weaving easier. 
     
    NOTE:Prerequisite for 102 and Guild is instructor approval. Materials fee is payable to Instructor on the first session of class. Guild materials fee is based on project selection
     
    Leslie Goldsmithis a graduate of the RPCS Nantucket Baskets Weaving Guild. She has woven nearly 100 Nantucket Baskets, including round, nests, birdhouses, ovals and purses. Leslie works with her husband Blake at Extraordinary Events, the Antique Exchange and Dutch Floral Gardens. Her daughter graduated from RPCS in 2005. 
  • Nantucket Bracelets

    Instructor: Leslie Goldsmith 
    Date: Wednesdays, September 26 & October 3
    Time: 6:00 – 8:30 PM 
    Fee: $75 / Materials Fee: $75 
     
    The Nantucket Lightship Basket traditional weave is used to create a beautifully woven reed bracelet with cherry endcaps. These bracelets have become extraordinarily popular on the island and, like the baskets, sell for hundreds of dollars. In this program you will learn the art of weaving wearable art!
     
    NOTE: Kit includes metal cuff, three preformed staves, weaver and cherry endcaps.
     
    Leslie Goldsmithis a graduate of the RPCS Nantucket Baskets Weaving Guild. She has woven nearly 100 Nantucket Baskets, including round, nests, birdhouses, ovals and purses. Leslie works with her husband Blake at Extraordinary Events, the Antique Exchange and Dutch Floral Gardens. Her daughter graduated from RPCS in 2005.

October

List of 14 items.

  • SOLD OUT - Great Books: "Anna Karenina" by Leo Tolstoy

    THIS CLASS IS NOW SOLD OUT

    Instructor
    : Judy Pittenger
    Date:
    Program One: Mondays, October 1, 8, 15, 29, November 5, 12, 26, December 3
    Program Two: Thursdays, October 4, 11, 18, November 1, 8, 15, 29, December 6
    Time: 4:306:00 PM
    Fee: $185
     
    Leo Tolstoy’s great classic novel Anna Kareninais a contrapuntal narration of two contrasting stories: the story of Anna’s passionate adultery which leads to her isolation and eventual self-destruction, and the story of Constantine Levin’s spiritual journey which leads to his affirmation of life within the context of family and community. Levin is a thinly disguised portrait of the author himself. The novel’s two stories of interior life are set against the great historical background of late 19thcentury Imperial Russia. Tolstoy confronts issues related to the agrarian and political problems of post-emancipation Russia as well as the controversy about Russia’s historical destiny raging between Russia’s Westernizers and the Slavophils. In addition, the author confronts universal and timeless issues such as skepticism and the meaning of religious faith, social convention and hypocrisy, passion and reason, existential meaning and mortality. The novel closely mirrors Tolstoy’s own spiritual pilgrimage. We shall consider the novel in relationship to Tolstoy’s biography and his other works, especially War and Peace. We shall also consider his achievement as it relates to the writing of other Russian writers of the century, in particular Pushkin, Dostoevsky, and Turgenev, and as an artistic and cultural expression of Imperial Russia. Tolstoy’s luminous prose style is well reflected in a splendid translation by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, and we will consider elements of his literary style. In short, we will examine the novel in all its dimensions. 
     
    NOTE:  Please purchase the Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky translation, Penguin Edition, ISBN-13: 978-0143035008
     
    With degrees from Stanford University, Judy Pittenger has taught for Kaleidoscope since 2002. She lectures and teaches frequently in Maryland and Florida, and has also taught for Oxford University’s Continuing Education program. She has received numerous awards from the National Endowment for the Humanities and in 1991 was named by the NEH as the Teacher-Scholar of Maryland.
     
  • SOLD OUT - The World of Mark Twain

    THIS CLASS IS NOW SOLD OUT

    Instructor
    : Judy Pittenger
    Date: Tuesdays, October 2, 9, 16, 30, November 6, 13, 27, December 4
    Time: 7:00 8:30 PM
    Fee: $185
     
    Mark Twain is perhaps the most quintessentially American of all our national writers. His novels not only stand at the center of the American canon, but also, according to a leading Twain scholar, he himself stands at the center of American life. Twain’s fame rests on nostalgic stories of America’s greatest river, but he also wrote of the Wild West and was a critic of American culture and life during the Gilded Age, a term he coined. His blistering criticisms of materialism and racism resonate today. Twain traveled across the globe and became an international celebrity, the most famous American of his time. He had a profound influence on subsequent generations of American writers.  “All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn,” declared Ernest Hemingway. In our consideration of Twain’s life and literature, we will read his three great classics, Tom Sawyer, Huckleberry Finn, and Life on the Mississippi as well as excerpts from other works, giving us a broad view of his impact on American letters. We will consider both the antebellum world of Twain’s youth and the postwar Civil War world of growth and expansion and Mark Twain’s unique position as an American icon.   
     
    NOTE:  Please purchase-
    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.  Penguin Edition, ISBN 9780143107323
    Life on the Mississippi.  Modern Library Classic ISBN 9780375759376
    The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Penguin Edition, ISBN 9780143107330
    All books may be purchased at a 10% discount at The Ivy.
     
    With degrees from Stanford University, Judy Pittenger has taught for Kaleidoscope since 2002. She lectures and teaches frequently in Maryland and Florida, and has also taught for Oxford University’s Continuing Education program. She has received numerous awards from the National Endowment for the Humanities and in 1991 was named by the NEH as the Teacher-Scholar of Maryland.
  • Financial Planning: Are you prepared for your future?

    Instructors: Kathy Armstrong and Elizabeth Paal, 2005 Certified Financial Planner and Chartered Retirement Planning Counselor
    Date: Wednesday, October 3
    Time: 7:00 8:30 PM 
    Fee: $30 
     
    Planning for your future should be exciting! To ensure that your goals are attainable you need the right tools for your finances. In this workshop, we will give you the tools to build your financial roadmap. There are many components to your finances that you need to combine in order to come up with a plan that will work for you. To name a few cash flow, debt management, risk management, investments, retirement and education planning. Possessing the tools is the first step to a new financially savvy you!
     
    Kathy Armstrong, a Certified Financial Planner practitioner, manages a financial planning practice at Heritage Financial Consultants in Hunt Valley, MD, providing comprehensive financial planning in the areas of investment management, retirement planning, personal risk management and estate planning. RPCS Alumna Elizabeth Paal, 2005, also a Certified Financial Planner practitioner at Heritage Financial Consultants, is Director of Financial Planning. Together, Kathy and Elizabeth (a mother-daughter team) deliver objective, straight-forward strategies to help clients achieve their lifetime goals. 
     
    Instructors are generously donating their fee for this program to RPCS.
  • The Japanese Perspective of World War II: Part 2, From Guadalcanal to the Surrender Aboard USS Missouri

    Instructor: Bob Mullauer
    Date: Wednesdays, October 3, 10, 17, 24
    Time: 7:00 9:00 PM
    Fee: $100
     
    We start the first class with one of the epic campaigns of the Pacific War. Guadalcanal lasted from August 1942 to February 1943. There was no other campaign in the Pacific where there was more prolonged and intense fighting on land, sea, and air, or where victory hung in the balance for so long. Classes two and three focus on the unsuccessful defense of the newly won Japanese Empire. The course concludes with the Allies preparing to invade the home islands and the dramatic end coming with two atomic bomb attacks and the Soviet Union's declaration of war and invasion of China in the span of four days. How and why did it happen? Uninterrupted success for the first 6 months of the war to near total defeat just over three years later, it is a story the world should never forget.
     
    Bob Mullauer is a History Instructor at Archbishop Curley High School in Baltimore, MD. He has taught military history courses for four different community colleges in and around Baltimore. He has served on the Board of Directors of the Maryland Military Historical Society and was a past president of the Baltimore Civil War Round Table. 
  • Meditation for Happiness

    Instructor: Susan Weis-Bohlen 
    Date: Thursdays, October 4, 11, 18, 25 
    Time: 6:00 7:30 PM 
    Fee: $150
     
    Just as we want to choose the healthiest foods for our body, we can learn how to choose the healthiest thoughts for our minds. In this program you will explore the time-tested meditation techniques that teach you how to gently and easily work with your mind to let go of negativity, constant chatter, and anything that isn’t serving you. Peace of mind, a deep sense of ease, and satisfaction with the way things are is attainable now. Learn how to make friends with your own mind. Susan draws from her experiences of the Vedas, Buddhism, Vipassana and Jewish Meditation techniques to help you be calmer and relaxed in your daily life and to view the world with heightened clarity and awareness. The by-product of a regular meditation practice is true happiness!
     
    Susan Weis- Bohlen is a is full-time Ayurvedic consultant, cooking teacher, meditation teacher, and leader of sacred site tours. Susan’s personal journey into the Ayurveda lifestyle began when she came across the Ayurvedic cleansing technique of panchakarma. What began as the release of damaging toxins and personal difficulties eventually grew into an impassioned vocation. She has since studied with the best teachers of Ayurveda, both in the US and in India. Susan knows exactly how challenging it can be to come to Ayurveda as a beginner and has dedicated her life to sharing the fruits of her studies with students all over the world.
  • Baltimore Gems

    Instructor: Meg Fairfax Fielding 
    Date: Monday, October 8
    Time: 6:30 8:00 PM 
    Fee: $25
     
    Have you ever wondered about that quirky little building you see in your drives around Baltimore? There are so many interesting buildings in our city,but as you’re zipping by them, it’s hard to really check out their details. Baltimore historian and architecture buff Meg Fairfax Fielding has spent the past few years searching out and researching some of Baltimore’s little hidden treasures. Join this informative discussion taking place during Architecture month and find out about the building you’ve discovered.
     
    Meg Fairfax Fielding is 12th generation Baltimore on her mother’s side and first generation on father’s side. Except for an interval living in Wales (in a 12th Century castle!) Meg has lived in Baltimore City for most of her life. Her popular blog, Pigtown*Design, focuses on design, decoration, architecture and all things Baltimore. 
  • The Immortal Sherlock Holmes

    Instructor: Greg Ruby
    Date: Tuesday, October 9
    Time: 7:00 – 9:00 PM
    Fee: $40
     
    Sherlock Holmes first appeared in 1887 in Beeton’s Christmas Annual. By 1927, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle would pen 56 short stories and four novels featuring the detective and his chronicler, Dr. John Watson. Doyle would publish other series such as The Lost Worldand the Brigadier Gerardadventures, among others. Doyle would also become active in politics, criminal justice and spiritualism in his later life. 
     
    Who was the inspiration for the character of Sherlock Holmes? What were some of his methodologies? What life details are we able to glean about Holmes and Watson from the stories? 
    The Guinness Book of World Records listed Holmes as the “most portrayed movie character” and he has appeared in thousands of stage productions, plays, pastiches, parodies and much more. We’ll take a look at several of these and also discuss some current projects that will be coming in the near future. 
     
    Holmes is such a cultural icon that many believe he was a real person and he still is getting letters mailed to him every day at 221b Baker Street in London. We’ll discuss “The Great Game” and the Sherlock Holmes fans who participate in it. The presentation will be augmented with both audio and visual clips 
     
    A freelance meeting and tradeshow consultant, Greg Ruby combines his passion for Baltimore and Maryland history with his interests in coin collecting and Sherlock Holmes. A past president of the Maryland Token and Medal Society and the Eastern States Numismatic Association, he is also the founder of the Sherlockians of Baltimore. He has been published in both the Sherlockian and numismatic press, and is currently cataloging medals featuring Edgar Allan Poe.
  • Travels: Singapore, Muscat, Oman, Dubai, Jordan, and The Suez Canal

    Instructor: John Butler
    Date: Wednesday, October 10
    Time: 7:00 8:30 PM
    Fee: $35
     
    Join us for a visual treat to five exotic destinations: Singapore city, Muscat, Oman, Dubai UAE and a full transit of Suez Canal! This travelogue will take you to Singapore to see buildings such as the world-famous Marina Bay Sands Hotel and the cities wonderful outdoor and indoor gardens. Singapore wants to be known as a city in a garden, not a garden in a city! Oman is a country located on Gulf of Hormuz and Muscat, Oman is a stand out because the city is filled with all white buildings. Omanis exhibit a very interesting culture of peace in a troubled area of the world. Dubai is a Persian Gulf city that touts the world’s tallest building and is an iconic city of skyscrapers in a desert setting. Next, we travel to Aqaba, Jordan where we visit Wadi Rum desert where Lawrence Of Arabiamovie was made. Finally, we visit the mighty Suez Canal filled with the 120-mile-long sea level salt water canal without locks that connects the Red Sea to the Mediterranean Sea. This presentation is a not to be missed!
     
    John Butleran accomplished photographer and world traveler, retired from Black & Decker Corporation after 33 years of service in sales and marketing management. During his career, he was the “go to” person to plan and execute a wide variety of business communication projects. He graduated from Virginia Commonwealth University with a BS in advertising/public relations. John teaches regularly in the Kaleidoscope program.
  • SOLD OUT - Les Misérables

    THIS IS NOW SOLD OUT

    Section
    : Orchestra
    Location: Hippodrome
    Date: Friday, October 12
    Time: 8:00 PM
    Fee: $90
     
    Optional bus transportation provided from RPCS campus departing at 7:00 PM
     
    The world’s most popular musical has audiences leaping to their feet in an acclaimed new production coming to The Hippodrome Theatre. Set against the backdrop of 19th-century France, Les Misérablesis an unforgettable story of heartbreak, passion, and the resilience of the human spirit, that has become one of the most celebrated musicals in theatrical history. Featuring a timeless score and the beloved songs “I Dreamed A Dream,” “On My Own,” “Bring Him Home,” and “One Day More,” this breathtaking new Broadway production has left both audiences and critics awestruck.
     
  • Walking Paths of Roland Park

    Instructors: Kathy Hudson, 1967 and Katherine Brower
    Date: Sunday, October 14
    Time: 2:00 – 4:00 PM 
    Fee: $40
     
    On this popular seasonal adventure, you will discover and explore the unique footpaths of the Roland Park community while learning about the history and architecture of the neighborhood. In developing this community in the late 1800s, the Roland Park Company incorporated into its plan a series of footpaths, 18 in all, designed to expedite foot traffic between various sections of the neighborhood, especially in those where the terrain made it difficult to build roads. Designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr., son of the famous landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted, Sr., in collaboration with Edward H. Bouton, general manager of the Roland Park Company, the paths were part of a hierarchical system of roads in front of houses, service lanes in the rear, and footpaths that provided convenient ways to cross through the neighborhood in a natural setting. Each path is named with a distinctly country ring: Squirrel, Hilltop, Laurel, Tulip; others are decidedly British: Audley End, Tintern, St. Margaret’s, Litchfield. 
     
    NOTE: Meet at Roland Park Branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library, 5108 Roland Avenue.
     
    For most of her life Kathy Hudson, 1967, has lived on a Roland Park footpath. She has written about the community, its residents and architecture for more than 25 years in The Baltimore Messenger, The Sun and Baltimore Style magazine.
  • iPhone Photography

    Instructor: Meg Fairfax Fielding 
    Date: Thursdays, October 18 & 25 
    Time: 6:30 8:00 PM 
    Fee: $60
     
    It’s so simple to take pictures with the camera on your iPhone, but are you getting the best photograph that you can? These two classes will take you through several simple editing programs, including the one on your phone, and show you how to make your pictures even better. During the first class, we will focus on how what makes a good photograph, how to take it, how to share it, and how to use iPhone editing features. During our second class, we will learn about photography apps and their features. 
     
    NOTE: To participate in this program, you will need an iPhone 6 or higher with the most recent operating system installed. Required apps to install before the first class: Instagram (free), Camera+ ($2.99) and Snapseed (free).
     
    Meg Fairfax Fielding is 12th generation Baltimore on her mother’s side and first generation on father’s side. Except for an interval living in Wales (in a 12th Century castle!) Meg has lived in Baltimore City for most of her life. Her popular blog, Pigtown*Design, focuses on design, decoration, architecture and all things Baltimore. 
  • A German U-Boat in Baltimore’s Harbor

    Instructor: Greg Ruby
    Date: Tuesday, October 23
    Time: 7:00 9:00 PM
    Fee: $40
     
    Baltimore was all abuzz when a German U-Boat appeared in Baltimore’s harbor on July 9, 1916. The Captain and crew were the toasts of the town for the better part of the month. However, this was just one small part of a local German-financed crew’s efforts to wreak havoc at ports and rail-yards to hinder deliveries to Germany’s enemies. They were headquartered out of the Hansa Haus, which stills stands today at Redwood (formerly German) and Charles Streets. 
     
    The discussion will focus on the key players in the plot that saw Germany eventually pay over $50 million in damages resulting from the crew’s activities. Collectibles from the U-Deustschland’s voyage and subsequent scrapping will also be shown. 
     
    A freelance meeting and tradeshow consultant, Greg Ruby combines his passion for Baltimore and Maryland history with his interests in coin collecting and Sherlock Holmes. A past president of the Maryland Token and Medal Society and the Eastern States Numismatic Association, he is also the founder of the Sherlockians of Baltimore. He has been published in both the Sherlockian and numismatic press, and is currently cataloging medals featuring Edgar Allan Poe.
  • SOLD OUT - Fall Garden Tour

    THIS CLASS IS NOW SOLD OUT

    Instructor
    : Kathy Hudson, 1967 
    Date: Tuesday, October 23
    Fee: $115
     
    Designed especially for Kaleidoscope by garden writer Kathy Hudson, our fall garden adventure features three beautiful Baltimore County gardens. The first outstanding garden is emblematic of the New American Garden style. You will view landscape architect Wolfgang Oehme’s trademark free-form style of curvaceous beds filled with waves of mass plantings of grasses, and perennials and shrubs that fit naturally with the rolling countryside. Steps lined with stone troughs lead down from the pond and front gardens to a wide bluestone terrace with breathtaking views.
     
    The second stop features one of the most exquisite private gardens and homes in the area. A serene garden that includes an array of harmonious elements: a wide-open lake, an aviary, acres of rolling lawns, a peaceful stream, plus artistic islands of plantings, artifacts and fine architecture. All elements converge to provide a peaceful, almost otherworldly space. The owner describes it as “having the sensibility of a Japanese garden without being overwrought.” Over the last 18 years, the house and garden have been restored and developed with inspiration from the mountain environment of the central Himalayas and Zen gardens in Kyoto. The property is now a vast and open landscape, conducive to both walking and contemplation. Smaller, more intimate areas provide focal points of color and texture.
     
    The final stop features a wonderful garden that in the 1990’s was transformed from rural Parkton farmland into a prairie style house with terraced gardens befitting the landscape. Included in these gardens designed for strolling are an award-winning pool surrounded by an ornamental vegetable garden, sculpture, and unusual plant specimens. Five years ago, the gardens grew to include Conservation Corps logging roads from the 1930s and a meadow for pollinators. Outside of the gardens is a forested wetland buffered by native ferns and mountain laurel.
     
    Note: A sit-down lunch at The Oregon Grille will be included in this event that will occur rain or shine. The mini-coach will depart form the Melrose Avenue parking lot, 5603 North Charles Street. Register early as space is limited.
     
    For most of her life Kathy Hudson, 1967, has lived on a Roland Park footpath. She has written about the community, its residents and architecture for more than 25 years in The Baltimore Messenger, The Sun and Baltimore Style magazine.
  • Robinson Health Colloquium

    Presentor: Rachel Simmons
    Date: Wednesday, October 24
    Time: 7:00 8:30 PM
     
    RPCS will be hosting Rachel Simmons as the Robinson Health Colloquium speaker.  Ms. Simmons is a bestselling author, educator and consultant helping girls and women be more authentic, assertive and resilient. http://www.rachelsimmons.com/

November

List of 10 items.

  • From Meeting House to Cathedral and Beyond: Baltimore's Historic Religious Landmarks 1730-1830

    Instructor: Wayne Schaumburg
    Date: Thursday, November 1
    Time: 7:00 - 8:30 PM
    Fee: $40
     
    Whether they are as simple as the Old Town Quaker Meeting House or as magnificent as the Catholic Basilica of the Assumption, Baltimore is a city with remarkable religious landmarks.  From Baltimore's beginnings in 1730, churches such as Old St. Pauls, Lovely Lane, Old Otterbein, First Unitarian, Sharp Street Memorial Methodist, have played a major role in our city's history as well as the religious history of our nation.
     
    This single session course is designed to introduce students to the enormous variety of religious landmarks in Baltimore City by looking at their history and architecture. Our focus will be the first century of the city's history, and we will look at eleven landmarks. Amazingly, all but one are in operation today! These religious structures cut across all the major religions in Baltimore to reveal a rich tapestry of our city's culture and traditions. 
     
    Wayne Schaumburg is a native Baltimorean who received his BS from Towson University, his MS from Morgan State University and his MLA from Johns Hopkins University. He taught social studies in the Baltimore City public school system for 39 years and retired in 2007. He has been leading tours of Baltimore for many years. He currently serves on the boards of Baltimore Heritage, and Historic Perry Hall Mansion. Wayne teaches regularly in the Kaleidoscope program. 
  • Ancient Rome: Kings, Consuls, and Emperors

    Instructor: Butch Darrell
    Date: Thursday, November 1, 8,15
    Time: 6:30 8:00 PM
    Fee: $70
     
    Butch Darrell taught Ancient History at Garrison Forest School for more than three decades. Unable to find an interesting text book, he wrote his own, which evolved from the traditional format of words with an occasional picture to a series of lessons consisting of pictures with words. These PowerPoint Lectures are excerpts from those lessons.  We will see the history and legends of Ancient Rome as depicted in the works of artists, sculptors, and architects, ancient and modern, as we discuss such subjects as Aeneas, Romulus and Remus, The Rape of Lucretia and the Expulsion of Tarquin, Cincinnatus, the Punic Wars, the Gracchus Brothers, Julius Caesar, Antony and Cleopatra, Augustus Caesar, Nero, Pompeii, the Good Emperors, Diocletian, and Constantine.  
     
    Butch Darrell taught ancient history at Garrison Forest School for three decades. Discovering that there is no such thing as an interesting ancient history textbook, he wrote and printed his own and included all of the unresolved conflict that published textbooks have been forced to leave out. As technology advanced, he created a paperless text through PowerPoint presentations that the students could access on their computers. Butch graduated from St. Paul’s School in Maryland and earned his BS from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. He received his MBA from Loyola University in Maryland, and his MLA from Johns Hopkins University.
  • SOLD OUT - Day Trip: The National Museum of African American History and Culture

    THIS TRIP IS NOW SOLD OUT

    In Partnership with Superior Tours
    Date: Monday, November 5
    Time: 7:30 AM5:30 PM
    Fee: $80
     
    Join Superior Tours as we travel to the The National Museum of African American History and Culture. Don't miss the incredible opportunity to tour this Smithsonian Institution museum, located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. The museum, designed by David Adjaye, has close to 37,000 objects in its collection. Learn about community, family, the arts, religion, civil rights, slavery and segregation through the lens of a people who played an integral part of shaping our nation.
     
    Trip will include: 
    • Roundtrip transportation via Superior Tours luxury motor coach
    • Continental breakfast
    • Knowledgeable tour guide
    • Admission ticket to museum
     
    Note: Trip departs from the Greenspring Shopping Center, 2801 Smith Avenue, promptly at 7:45 AM. 
  • Maryland Voices of the Civil War: Understanding the Civilian Experience

    Instructor: Charles W. Mitchell
    Date: Mondays, November 5 & 19
    Time: 6:30 8:30 PM
    Fee: $50
     
    The Civil War deeply divided families, friends and communities. Both sides fought to define the conflict on their own terms—Lincoln and his supporters struggled to preserve the Union and end slavery, while the Confederacy waged a battle for the primacy of local liberty or the states’ rights. No state better exemplified the vital role of the border state than Maryland—where the passage of time has not dampened debates over issues such as the legality of secession and executive power versus civil liberties in wartime. Through the lens of the civilian experience, this class will examine the animating themes of Maryland’s Civil War story. The discussions will draw upon Mitchell’s award-winning book, Maryland Voices of the Civil War, and its reliance on many letters, diaries, and period newspapers—many previously unpublished—to portray the passions of a wide variety of people—merchants, slaves, soldiers, politicians, freemen, women, clergy, slave owners, civic leaders and children—caught in the emotional and violent vise of war. 
     
    Charles W. Mitchell is author of Maryland Voices of the Civil War, which won the 2007-2008 Founders Award from the American Civil War Museum. He is also author of Travels Through American History in the Mid-Atlantic: A Guide for All Ages, which won a Lowell Thomas Gold Medal (guidebook category) from the Society of American Travel Writers. He holds degrees from the Pennsylvania State University and the University of Maryland.
  • Hans Schüler, Baltimore's Monument Maker

    Instructor: Greg Ruby
    Date: Wednesday, November 7
    Time: 7:00 9:00 PM
    Fee: $40
     
    Dotted around Baltimore are many monuments that were created by sculptor Hans Schuler. The long-serving director of the Maryland Institute has works that can be found in the Walters Art Gallery, Johns Hopkins University, Patterson Park, and Greenmount Cemetery, as well as in Pennsylvania and Louisiana. 
     
    In addition to his many sculptures and statues, Hans Schuler created many medals and medallions that are highly prized by collectors. He was the designer of the U.S. half dollar struck in 1934 to commemorate the Maryland Tercentenary. 
    This illustrated presentation is based on 30 years of collecting and research. 
     
    A freelance meeting and tradeshow consultant, Greg Rubycombines his passion for Baltimore and Maryland history with his interests in coin collecting and Sherlock Holmes. A past president of the Maryland Token and Medal Society and the Eastern States Numismatic Association, he is also the founder of the Sherlockians of Baltimore. He has been published in both the Sherlockian and numismatic press, and is currently cataloging medals featuring Edgar Allan Poe.
  • Opera 101

    InstructorAndrea Copland
    Date: Wednesday, November 7
    Time: 6:30 8:30 PM
    Fee: $40
     
    Opera is one of the longest-enduring musical forms, spanning over four centuries and across multiple continents. But you don’t need a deep knowledge of music, familiarity with Italian, or fancy opera-going garb to enjoy it.This class dispels the mystery and stuffiness that sometimes surrounds this genre and make opera accessible to anyone. We’ll discuss the basics, including key terms, and a breakdown of what is happening on stage and in the music. We’ll also talk about opera’s development, from its original conception to new works being composed today. You’ll come away with the skills to enjoy, understand, and talk about opera like an expert music critic, without actually being one.

    Andrea Copland
     is currently completing dual Master’s of Music degrees in Oboe Performance ('19) and Musicology ('20) at the Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University, where she  is a recipient of the Artistic Excellence and Irving and Margery Morgan Lowens Endowed scholarships, works in the Arthur Friedheim Library as Graduate Student Circulation Manager, and studies with Jane Marvine. Previously, she earned degrees from the University of Denver in Oboe Performance (BM ‘13) and Information Science (MLIS ‘17). Her musicological research explores the intersections between music, national identity, and politics through resistance as [un]represented in historical documentation.
  • Versailles: The Treaty that made the 20th Century

    Instructor: Judy Pittenger
    Date: Wednesdays, November 7, 14, 28, December 5
    Time: 4:30 6:00 PM
    Fee: $90
     
    On November 11, 1918, the Great War, the “war to end all wars,” finally came to an end. Empires fell, the kings departed. The world was ready for refashioning. Within weeks, allied diplomats were gathering in Paris to establish a brave new world, built on the ashes of the old. Led by the Big Three—President Woodrow Wilson, British prime minister David Lloyd George, and French premier Georges Clemenceau—they were determined to shape a lasting peace for the new century. Instead they produced a blueprint for political and social upheavals that brought even greater devastation to the world, and we are still living in the wake of the treaty’s consequences. In particular, seeds of the German catastrophe and the continuing crisis in the Middle East were sown. The League of Nations, a centerpiece of the treaty and the world’s prospective peacekeeper, was rejected by America, which retreated into isolationism. In this series of four lectures we will examine the hopes, achievements and failures of the delegates at the Paris Peace Conference, which convened one hundred years ago.    
      
    NOTE: Paris 1919by Margaret MacMillan and published by Random House provides an excellent background for this course.  
     
    With degrees from Stanford University, Judy Pittenger has taught for Kaleidoscope since 2002. She lectures and teaches frequently in Maryland and Florida, and has also taught for Oxford University’s Continuing Education program. She has received numerous awards from the National Endowment for the Humanities and in 1991 was named by the NEH as the Teacher-Scholar of Maryland.
  • An Eye on Greece

    Instructor: John Butler
    Date: Tuesday, November 13
    Time: 7:00 8:30 PM
    Fee: $35
     
    Come see the visual splendor of Greece and this photographer’s view of it contrasting landscapes, treasures of the past, people, and the incredible sculptured coasts and deep blue seas. This exciting presentation will take you to the beautiful and historic islands of Mykonos, Patmos, Rhodes, Crete and Santorini. Once on the mainland this tour will take you to Olympia, where the famous Olympic Games were established. Next, we visit the ancient city of Delphi as we pass the Sacred Way to the Sanctuary of Apollo. We move on to the town of Meteora to see the monasteries built high up on the tall rock formations. This trip ends in the city of Athens, the cradle of Western culture, where white monuments still dominate the landscape, and you can step back in time at The Acropolis and other monuments. Come enjoy this colorful presentation!
     
    John Butler,an accomplished photographer and world traveler, retired from Black & Decker Corporation after 33 years of service in sales and marketing management. During his career, he was the “go to” person to plan and execute a wide variety of business communication projects. He graduated from Virginia Commonwealth University with a BS in advertising/public relations. John teaches regularly in the Kaleidoscope program.
  • Made in Hollywood: Hepburn and Tracy on (and off) the Screen

    Instructor: Christopher Llewellyn Reed
    Date: Wednesday, November 14
    Time: 7:00 9:00 PM
    Fee: $40
     
    Katharine Hepburn (1907-2003) and Spencer Tracy (1900-1967) met on the set of George Stevens’ 1942 press-room comedy Woman of the Year. From then until Tracy’s death they were an often-inseparable duo, both on- and off-screen, though Tracy remained married to his wife Louise Treadwell the whole time. All told, Hepburn and Tracy, big stars the one without the other, made 9 films together. Beyond Woman of the Year, these include: State of the Union (1948), Adam’s Rib (1949), Pat and Mike (1952), Desk Set (1957) and Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (1967). Join us as we revisit their delightful work together through clips and analysis, placing their partnership in its proper historical context.
     
    Christopher Llewellyn Reed is a filmmaker, film critic and Chair of the Film & Moving Image Department at Stevenson University. He holds a BA from Harvard University in Slavic Languages and Literatures (concentration in Russian), an MA from Yale University, in Russian and East European Studies (concentration in Russian Film), and an M.F.A. from the Graduate Film Program at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. Chris writes frequently on current independent cinema at Hammer to Nail, writes the occasional piece for Bmoreart and blogs regularly about all kinds of movies. In addition, he is the host of Dragon Digital Media’s award-winning Reel Talk with Christopher Llewellyn Reed, is a regular film review contributor to The Baltimore Sun’s “Roughly Speaking” podcast, and is the author of Film Editing: Theory and Practice.
  • 36th Annual St. Albans Christmas House Tour & Boutiques

    Escorted by Kristin Jarrell and Quinlin Porter
    Date: Friday, November 30
    Time: 8:30 AM 6:00 PM
    Fee: $130
     
    Filled with homes, harmonies, holly, and holiday shopping, the 36th annual St. Albans Christmas House Tour is the perfect way to start the holiday season. Our day will begin at the lovely St. Albans School campus located on the grounds of the National Cathedral in Washington, DC. Upon our arrival, enjoy some time for shopping at the holiday gift boutiques located on the school campus. Vendors display a variety of gift items, including gourmet treats, handmade clothing, jewelry, and much more. 
     
    Beginning at 11:00 AM, the Christmas House Tour will commence featuring homes in the Wesley Heights section of Washington D.C. Each stunning home will be decorated by leading floral designers who will transform each home with unique seasonal decorations. Students from St. Albans will provide musical accompaniment. Complimentary shuttle buses will run from St. Albans School to each house on the tour. You may also choose to walk between houses following the tour map you will receive at check-in. Your day also includes a gourmet holiday luncheon served at St. Albans School. You have the option of ending your day with additional exploration of the holiday boutiques, a stroll on the picturesque campus grounds, or a visit on your own to the National Cathedral and gardens. 
     
    Note: Travel time is approximately 1.5 hours. Our luxury motor coach will depart from the Church of the Redeemer's Melrose Avenue parking lot, 5603 N. Charles Street. Many vendors accept cash only.

December

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  • A Christmas Celebration in Art and Music

    Instructor: Judy Pittenger
    Date: Tuesday, December 11
    Time: 4:30 6:00 PM
    Fee: $35
     
    The story of Christmas comes to most of us first in words, in particular the pure and majestic prose of the King James Bible. Secondly our vision of the Nativity comes from great works of western art and music. For well over a millennium artists and musicians have been inspired by the Christmas story. Countless works of art have become part of our cultural heritage, from Botticelli’s “Annunciation” and Brueghel’s “Census in Bethlehem” to Ruben’s “Adoration of the Magi” and Gauguin’s “Tahitian Madonna.” Bach’s “Magnificat” and Handel’s oratorio “The Messiah,” Franz Gruber’s “Silent Night” and Benjamin Britten’s “Ceremony of Carols” have told the story in music. Join Judy Pittenger for a celebration of Christmas in art and music as we welcome the holiday season. Participants will enjoy a wine and cheese buffet before the program.    
     
    With degrees from Stanford University, Judy Pittenger has taught for Kaleidoscope since 2002. She lectures and teaches frequently in Maryland and Florida, and has also taught for Oxford University’s Continuing Education program. She has received numerous awards from the National Endowment for the Humanities and in 1991 was named by the NEH as the Teacher-Scholar of Maryland.