Philanthropic Literacy Board

Uniting students' experiences and their growing understanding of the critical issues facing the Baltimore community with the opportunity to effect positive change, the RPCS Philanthropic Literacy Board (PLB) is one of many programs our students can engage in as a means of leading for the greater good in the world around them. Participants on this board are the decision makers who oversee the grant proposal process, defining their mission and evaluating applications from Baltimore area non-profits.

This student-led organization first selects a theme or area of focus for their year’s work.

Student board members research the local non-profit organizations engaged in that area of need, make a series of site visits to see this work in action, and then develop a Request for Proposals that they send to those organizations.  PLB members then evaluate applicants and choose which organizations they feel should be awarded the funds.  Organizations that have been awarded funds in previous years are invited back to help the PLB members understand the impact of the PLB’s award on the organization’s work.  This legacy of empowerment is then passed by the graduating seniors to the rising senior class for the next year.

2019 Philanthropic Literacy Board Announcement

Roland Park Country School’s student-run Philanthropic Literacy Board is pleased to announce the winners of this year's student grants that support the theme: Youth Wellness—Providing After School Community Resources for Baltimore City Youth.

This year’s board members endeavored to uplift and provide support to underprivileged youth seeking after school extra-curricular programs in Baltimore City. We believe that all students deserve access to a wide range of learning opportunities, but not every child is afforded a diverse range of educational experiences that enhance their talents and skills. We are concerned about the impact a lack of enrichment opportunities can have on a child’s future and are seeking grant applications from non-profits that are focused on providing high quality after-school programs—including tutoring, athletics, and the arts—in order to enhance the lives of our youth in Baltimore. 

Our committee awarded one grant to each of the organizations below on Tuesday, May 7, for a total of $5,000. Learn more about how each of these organizations plan to use this grant money to further enrich extracurricular experiences for Baltimore City youth.

Bridges at Gilman School
Bridges at Gilman School is an academic and social enrichment program that serves motivated low-income Baltimore City public school students. This grant money will be used to provide yoga instruction to the fourth and fifth grade students during their after-school program in an effort to promote physical and mental health. Students will also learn meditation and mindfulness techniques.

The Club at Collington Square
The Club at Collington Square is an after school and summer program serving 112 children in grades K-8, in the Clifton-Berea neighborhood of East Baltimore. The highly structured program runs for three hours after school and includes academics, enrichment, play, and homework help. The awarded funds will support the general operations of the club, particularly supporting the expenses for their dedicated staff and personnel.

Parks & People Foundation
Parks & People Foundation serves 600-700 students each school year during three, eight-week after school sports league seasons. This grant will support accessible, safe and healthy after school sports programs to Baltimore middle school students each year. These students typically live in lower income Baltimore neighborhoods.

The Philanthropic Literacy Board presents their grant funds to the program director of Bridges at Gilman.

The Club at Collington Square will use their grant funding to support general operations for their after school and summer programs.

The PLB's third grant recipient, Parks & People Foundation, is one of the largest providers of after school athletics to public middle schools in Baltimore.

Students work with Head of School Caroline Blatti on a PLB grant proposal.